Owning A Pet: Are You Responsible Enough?

     Pet owner     Owning a pet is not as easy as ABC. You have to consider a lot of things. Our pets provide unconditional love and care for us, but let us not forget the responsibilities we have in taking care of them.

   Owning a pet is aPet owner lifetime commitment. Pet animals and their owner develop deep bonds between them. It is a must to provide your pet shelter, food, water, medical care, love and attention.

     Before taking your new pet home, you must make sure you have all the basic needs. You must secure everything your pet needs before taking it home. These include a collar, ID tag and Rabies tag, leash, food and water bowls, a comfortable bed and toys. Find a good Vet. Having your pet’s personal veterinarian is less hassle than looking for one in times of emergency.Pet owner

 

‘Dog-proof’ home. Be sure to keep anything that can poison your pets. Not only it harms your pet, if you have kids in the house, you’re also saving them.

 

And above all, make sure that owning a pet is the right choice. You own a pet not be-cause your neighbor does. You bought a pet because it suits your living.Pet owner

 

Now, if you are ready. I bet you will become a responsible pet owner.

 

 

 

 

Yza Angela E. Turingan

Freshman MassCom

St. Paul University of Manila

Pet owner

 

The Man Who Started It All

         Dr. Enrique Carlos   Sixto Almeda Carlos y Nepomuceno was born in Biñan, Laguna. His father with the same name was from Biñan, Laguna and his mother from Binondo, Manila. He established a Dog and Cat Clinic in 1927 and had his family home above the clinic; so much so that he was checking his patient (dogs and cats) as early as 4:00 AM. He was also active as a horse practi-tioner in San Lazaro and later in Sta. Ana. He was a stewart in the horse races. He was also well known by kutseros (calesa or caritella horse drivers) when services for free every Tuesdays. Being a devotee of the Black Nazarene in Quiapo, he reli-giously participated in the procession. He was registered in the government regulating office in the registration with number 057.

In 1918 together with Dr. Victor Abreu Buencamino, he is the first Filipino of-ficer of the PVMA in 1918 to 1919 as treasurer and Dr. Beuncamino as presi-dent while other officers being Ameri-cans.

In 1958, his son Dr. Enrique Rodriguez Carlos took over the Dog and Cat Hospi-tal in the same building in 185 Marquez de Comillas and later renamed 839 Romualdez St. . This was the first dog and cat hospital in Manila.

Dr. Sixto Almeda Carlos was also a Philippine delegate in the 1948 London Olympics. A great grandson, Rodolfo Sebastian S. Carlos was one of the torch bearers from among the 8,000 of the 2012 London Olympics. The Carlos family have been offering services to dog and cat companion animals. Currently, Dr. Sixto Enrique Miguel Alimudin Carlos y Siap-no continues the small animal practice in the Makati Dog and Cat Hospital.

Dr. Enrique T. Carlos

DR. ENRIQUE R. CARLOS

Dr. Enrique R. Carlos established the Makati Dog and Cat Hospital in 1962 with postal address of Amapola, Bel-Air III with telephone no, 88-63-86 and 87-28-60 now 5426 Gen. Luna cor. Algier St. Poblacion, Makati City; while the address has changed the physical location is the same. He maintained the Dog and Cat Hospital in 839 Romualdez St. Ermita, Manila with telephone no, 3-22- 60. He took over the hospital from his father Sixto Almeda Carlos in 1959.

Dr. Enrique R. Carlos was born on April 24, 1921 and was baptized Jose Antonio Vicente Enrique Almeda Carlos y Rodriguez. He graduated from the University of the Philippine College of Veterinary Science located in the Bureau of Animal Industry (AI) compound in Pandacan, Manila, now the Malacanang Security compound in 1972. Since the Nagtahan Bridge was not yet existing students ands personel of the Bureau of Animal Industry would ride a banca to cross the Pasig River and for those with car would be picked up at the other side to San Miguel and Malacanang.

In 1972, he was appointed to the College if Medicine, University of the Philippines as part-time professor without
compensation in the Department of Medicine. He was also appointed as Visiting Scientist of the NAMRU II (Navy and Marine Research Unit) of the US Navy doing extensive research on Leptospirosis and other pathogens. He was also a Consultant of the research facilities of the Veterans Memorial Hospital.

Dr. Enrique R. Carlos (right) with his father Dr. Sixto Almeda Carlos (left).

Dr. Enrique R. Carlos (right) with his
father Dr. Sixto Almeda Carlos (left).

TOOTHPASTE for PETS? No PROMBLEM.

With all the different toothpaste brands out in the market, my patients often ask me which one I would recommend the most.  And my reply is always the same: the one that you LIKE the most.   Of course there are “specialty” toothpaste out there that cater to specific needs (like tooth sensitivity, whitening and fluoride allergy) where this response doesn’t apply, but with regards to toothpaste for everyday use it just simply doesn’t matter.  What does matter though is how you brush your teeth: how long, how often, how hard, and what kind of strokes you use.  The reason for this all boils down to what actually causes tooth decay and gum disease in the first place: dental plaque.  Dental plaque is that soft yellowish film that forms on the tooth surface after it is exposed to food particles.  This film is produced by bacteria in the mouth that adhere to the tooth surface. When not effectively controlled, these bacteria consume sugars in the mouth, and as by-product produce acidic materials that destroy tooth structure, as well as the gums and their supporting structures.  The way therefore in eliminating the risk of tooth decay and gum disease is to remove plaque and food debris in the mouth, and this is achieved by proper tooth brushing. When done properly, the bristles of the brush mechanically sweep away the plaque from the tooth surface, thereby eliminating the primary cause of tooth decay and gum disease.  This is made even more effective when flossing is done by the patient, to remove food debris from the area of the teeth that can’t be reached by tooth brushing.

This is not to say that toothpaste do not help in the fight against tooth decay and gum disease.  toothpaste contain fluoride that helps strengthen the teeth and fight off bacteria.  Some may even contain calcium which are supposed to help strengthen teeth and bone (the effectiveness of which is debatable since calcium exchange happens between blood and bone and not with erupted teeth).  However these benefits are only secondary to the mechanical removal of plaque by brushing and flossing, since the application of toothpaste alone cannot effectively eliminate plaque production in the mouth.  As a result, toothpaste application becomes only supplementary to tooth brushing in maintaining good oral health.  So going back to the original question on which toothpaste is the best: it’s the one that (for you) tastes the best, smells the best, and makes you want to brush your teeth longer, and more often. No toothpaste? No problem!

th

Dax B.Cordero, DDM

General Dentistry

L/G Floor Corinthian Gardens Clubhouse, Corinthian Gardens Subdivision, QC

Tel: 637-8729

dax.cordero@yahoo.com